Teach ESL Abroad - The Jet program

The Jet Program is a solid choice if you're going to teach ESL abroad for a year or two. Competition is simply brutal but it’s definitely worth taking a shot. Still, if you want to experience Japan, it beats workin’ for most large conversation schools.

Jet. Many apply. Few are accepted…

Teach ESL Abroad – Participating Countries

Taken from Jet's official website, here's the break-down of countries participating in the Jet program and their acceptance numbers. So looking at the whole list… your top 10 runners for 2009 are the: U.S. with 2537, second in line is Canada with 481, following is The U.K. with 390, Australia with 272, New Zealand with 194, South Africa with 102, Ireland with 96, China with 74, South Korea 58, Singapore with 53 and bringing up the rear is Jamaica with 52.

Note these numbers include all positions i.e. CIR, SEA, and ALT.

Teach ESL Abroad – Jet Experiences

Jet experiences vary greatly. Many new to the teaching scene in Japan regard the Jet Program as the “holy grail” of jobs. And while the Jet Program does pay better (50,000 yen per month on average), than the big 4, Jet isn't without their problems too. Some get gravy jobs with nice, large and subsidized apartments while others claim they don’t have heat in the winter and their shack of an apartment is infested with bugs.

The Jet official line regarding the massive swings in living and working conditions is “each situation is different.” It’s the mantra of this organization.

Teach ESL Abroad – Making The Cut: Not So Easy

Thousands apply for few positions and getting in is definitely more difficult than you're average eikaiwa school. How difficult? Pretty damn difficult. Annual turnover is a meager 2500 to 3000 positions. Then when you consider the shear number of applicants who apply from over 44 countries…. Well you get the picture. This gives them more than enough qualified candidates to choose from in addition to making them too busy to answer even the most basic questions. (We address quite a few of them on this page.)

Teach ESL Abroad – The Waiting is the Hardest Part

One of the biggest hurdles you have to jump over in getting into the Jet Program is the excruciating waiting game that many Jet applicants complain of. Here’s the blow-by-blow description on the hiring schedule. It all begins before Halloween but you’ll have to wait until June to see if you made the cut. This timeline is from their official website. (It applies to all countries except Peru, Brazil, Korea and China).

Here we go…

  • Early Applications Accepted - Late November
  • Application Deadline* (Varies by Country) January
  • 1st Notice Sent to Applicants - February / March
  • Interviews at Japanese Embassies / Consulates - Late March / April
  • Interview Results Sent to Tokyo - April
  • 2nd Notice Sent to Applicants - May
  • Submit Health Check and Reply Forms - May-August
  • Successful Applicants Receive Notification - May / June / July
  • Successful Applicants Receive Placement Information - July
  • Pre-Departure Orientation - July / August
  • Departure on Designated Day - July / August

Now you can see why so many wannabe Jets are yanking their hair out!

Teach ESL Abroad – Do’s and Don’ts For Jets

The application process is a bit more than tedious. When it comes to crossing your t’s and dotting your i’s, these folks be flat out serious. Any missteps in their application process usually causes your application to get whacked. So providing all information in accordance with their guidelines is critical to getting through this stage and being invited to an interview.

Survival Tip:
When you apply to the Jet Program it’s important to use the most recent application as they make changes every year to their applications. Why take chances?

  • Don’t open your letters of reference for a quick look-see. They’ll assume foul-play. These applications aren’t entered in the race.
  • Also, remember to send ALL information for your position TOGETHER. So send your transcripts, application, letters of reference together etc. to the Jet office.
  • Send your official transcripts. Don’t do the photo copy thing... Jet folks will look for an embossed seal, and the registrar's signature.
  • Just like when applying for state employment, It’s definitely NOT okay to send a resume instead of an application. So fill-it out.
  • During the application season, if you’re dying to see if they got your package, send it certified. The Jet office doesn’t like fielding calls during the application period.
  • Also no matter what the circumstance, you need to do your interview in your home country. They don’t take kindly to the switch thing.

  • Return From Teach ESL Abroad to Home